2015
03.27

Dear Car Guy,

Hey. It’s been a bit. I hope this finds you fast and happy.

I was thinking about all the products you’ve purchased over time. From the SRI and hood scoop, to the fuel pump internals and Injector Seals, you’ve made your ‘baby’ look awesome, drive well, and perform at her very best. We all know that the few decals you’ve put on have added at least 17whp as well.

I was curious, though: What do you have for yourself? Your Mazda looks awesome with decals and cosmetic parts that make her sheen at all times, but what do you have?

A lanyard? Does that even count as swag for you, or is that also for her?

Seriously though, we have t-shirts, a couple of which you may have already, and hats, and a license plate frame.

I just really wonder what else do you want. We’ve had joking requests for female undergarments (we’re still looking into that one…) but what kind of Mazda and CorkSport swag would you love to own?

Do you want sweatshirts with sweet logos or imprints of a speed3?

Source: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/551128073120166042/

Source: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/551128073120166042/

Or do you want belt buckles with CS on the front, like some motocross rodeo guy?

Source: http://www.coolbuckles.com/widogdafubar.html

Source: http://www.coolbuckles.com/widogdafubar.html

We’ve sent out some extra swag items over the years, as a thank you to our great customers. A few coozies here and there:

CorkSport Beer Coozies

Source: Our great customers

 

And a couple ice scrapers for those of you who have had it rough this past winter…. Oh wait, it’s still going… (Sore subject?)

Overall, I’d love to hear from you about what it is you want in terms of SWAG options. Tell us in the comments, or right here.

Looking forward to hearing from you soon about them. Stay safe, stay happy, and stay fast.

Cheers, Kim

Kim Russell-01

2015
03.25

Looking to add a little style to the interior of your Genjuan? Or maybe you’re searching for another performance product to give you the edge? What if I told you I could give you both of those with one performance product?

Introducing the new CorkSport Performance Steering Wheel for 2007-2009 Mazdaspeed 3!

Increase your Mazdaspeed's handling and style with this new leather steering wheel.

No stitching required! The CorkSport Performance Steering Wheel was designed to be a direct OEM replacement. It works flawlessly with the OEM steering column, covers, button panels, and airbag for a stress-free 30 minute installation. Check out the images below: On the left shows exactly what you would receive in the package. On the right is a fully assembled steering wheel with all the OEM components.

Installing Mazdaspeed 3 Steering Wheel

Now I have to admit, when this product idea (Big thanks to Brett Ross!) came across my desk, I was a bit skeptical. I’m not one to spend money on aesthetics on my Mazdaspeed 3. So we got a prototype manufactured, and I installed it in my car to begin the R & D process. Within minutes, I was sold—and not just by how good it looked in my 09’ MS3, but by how much more connected I felt with the car.

Mazdaspeed 3 Steering Wheel for Better Driving Experience

While driving I saw the value in a performance steering wheel—things like the hand wrapped and stitched leather that has a slight texture and plush feel to it. The perforated leather in the high use areas is a great addition so your hands won’t get clammy on spirited drives. The wheel diameter is the same, but the thickness of the wheel has been increased, which is much more comfortable for long drives and canyon carving. The flat bottom gives it a more aggressive feel and actually makes it easier to get in and out of the car since I’m 6’ 2” tall. All that said, probably the most exciting feature of the CorkSport Performance Steering Wheel are the aggressive thumb grooves. These help you lock your hands in place, giving you more confidence in the twisty roads and while fighting the lovely torque steer.

Why You Need a New Mazdaspeed 3 Steering Wheel

Trust me when I say, you need to try the CorkSport Performance Mazdaspeed 3 Steering Wheel. You will be pleasantly surprised.

-Barett, CS Engineering.

2015
03.20

Have you heard about FSAE? You Haven’t? Well, grab a beer and take a seat. We have quite the journey ahead of us.

The Basics

Formula SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers) is an international collegiate design competition held among colleges and their associated student groups. The project is to design and build an open-wheel race car (within the specified rules) to compete in both dynamic and static events.

The dynamic events include:

  • A 300ft drag race
  • Left/right skid pad
  • Single pass autocross track
  • A closed loop autocross track run for 20 minutes, which is also scored on fuel economy.

The static events include:

  • An engineering design event
  • A cost analysis event
  • A marketing presentation.

The goal of the project is to simulate a new startup company that designs and builds track day cars that are affordable for the average guy. All right. That’s the background. Now, I hope you enjoy my personal FSAE journey.

FSAE Sample Race Car Design

First Encounters with FSAE

For me, it all started in September of 2011. I had just transferred to Portland State University (PSU) to begin my upper division classes in Mechanical Engineering. The classes were difficult, and I didn’t know anyone at Portland State. One day, I came across the PSU Viking Motorsport Formula SAE student group. I was instantly hooked, getting whatever information I could from the couple of members I met. Before I knew it I was in the student group’s lab, tinkering with the car and asking way too many questions. I had no idea what I was getting myself into at the time, and I’ll admit: I’m glad I didn’t because I don’t know if I would have stuck it out any other way.

I attended a second meeting with enthusiasm, which landed me managing the cooling system for the next race car. A mixture of stress and excitement overwhelmed me.

Building an FSAE Race Car

You only have a year with FSAE, which means we had to work quickly. Within a few weeks the 2012 race car was beginning to take shape.

FSAE Race Car Frame

Remember: This wasn’t built from a kit. From concept to 3D computer model to the immense amount of fabrication, we did it all. Not to mention the 12-21 credits of engineering classes, and on top of it all some of us were working an hourly job—myself included. Sounds crazy, huh? You have no idea unless you’ve done it.

With a goal to have an operational race car by mid-February there were at least eight members spending 60-80 hours per week building the race car. There were many late nights—actually, “early mornings” are a better way to put it—that ended like this:

Working Late on an FSAE Car

But with every tough time there was a moment like this to remind us to have fun:

FSAE Fun Engineering

The Fruit of Our Labor

By March, only a couple weeks behind schedule, we had an operational race car, and we were feeling pretty awesome (to have an operational race car by then was impressive in this competition) and ready to start testing and tuning. With so much time spent in the machine shop and lab, we were all very excited to get some fresh air at the test track. Who wouldn’t be excited with a view like this?

FSAE Race Test Track

Our testing and tuning consisted of every aspect of vehicle dynamics. Tire pressure, camber, caster, anti-squat, anti-lift, toe, spring rate, and damping rate adjustment—not to mention the live engine tuning via wireless connection. Testing and tuning days were an absolute blast, but they were packed full of problems and solutions, because that’s the reality of a race car. On top of our private testing and tuning, we would also participate in local SCCA autocross events, because it was more testing and great driver training. These events were usually a bit more relaxed if there weren’t any issues.

The FSAE Competition

Let’s fast forward a few months to the actual competition held in Lincoln, Nebraska.

The most important step was getting through tech inspection. Tech inspection, or commonly called “scrutineering”, involved four stations, each testing a different aspect of the car. First, the car is thoroughly inspected by officials to verify all the rules had been followed. Second, accelerate for a set distant then apply the brakes at full force. All four tires must lock up and the race car cannot rotate out of control. Third, rev the engine to a set RPM for 3 seconds without overshooting the 110dB threshold. Fourth, the epic tilt table. The car and driver are tilted to over 60 degrees to check for leaks and to simulate a 2.5G cornering force. Sound nerve-wracking? It can be, but this is also pretty fun:

FSAE Testing

To our surprise, we were the third team to get through tech inspection. That may not seem like a huge accomplishment, but you need to understand that some teams never even get through tech inspection at all. The tests are exhaustive, especially for college students who just built a racing vehicle from scratch. With the tech sticker on our race car we were off to prepare for the next few days of static and dynamic events.

The next morning came, and the first event on our schedule was the design presentation. This was my biggest worry of the whole competition. Four very well educated and known motorsports engineers drill you for an entire hour with questions about your design and your decisions to get to that design. It was like standing in front of the firing squad.

Formal FSAE Design Presentation

All-in-all we did pretty well for being more of a hands-on focused team. The important thing was the most difficult event was behind us. Next were the other two static events, but I didn’t present in these, so we will just move forward to the dynamic events.

Like any good race car it was having issues that we couldn’t for the life of us diagnose. After limping the race car through the drag race and skid pad events, we narrowed the issues down to the fuel pressure regulator and a potential tuning issue. After completely re-designing the fuel system from an in-tank setup to an external setup we had the car running much better. There was still a mysterious tuning issue, but with only minutes to spare we pushed (all race cars had to be pushed to the events according to the rules) the race car to the autocross event in an attempt at least score some points.

Pushing an FSAE Race Car

The race car was difficult to drive as the throttle response was poor to say the least, but I managed to finish 25th of 90. I later found out that this was the highest score for the autocross event in PSU’s history.

Check out the Autocross event here. (Skip to 3:15.)

Last but not least was the endurance event. This event is worth 40% of the total competition points and is by far the most demanding dynamic event. On average, only 60% of the teams that start the event finish. The most common issues are engine overheating or failure to restart after the driver change, but sometimes you have an unusual issue much like the one we had to overcome. I was the first driver for the endurance event, so I was forced to improvise. The bracket that stops the accelerator pedal broke on my first lap, which resulted in the accelerator pedal being stuck wide open. I couldn’t get my foot around the pedal to pull it loose, and quitting wasn’t an option. With no other choice, I drove the next ten laps throttling through the corners with the clutch, leaving the throttle wide open. As you can see in the video, things got a little out of control for a bit, but I managed to finish my ten laps without blowing up the car.

The FSAE Endurance Challenge

We changed drivers and proceeded to complete the endurance event with a broken chain tensioner at lap 18. Through all those issues we finished 14th in the endurance event.

Check out the Endurance event here.

With all the points tallied up, we finished 16th place of 90 teams at FSAE Lincoln. This was and still is the highest placing in PSU’s history. None of this would have been possible without the support of my fellow teammates and our extremely supportive adviser, Evan Waymire. Of course we learned a ton about engineering, but also, and maybe most importantly, that life is not about the issues you face, but about the ways you solve them.

Barett Strecker-01

2015
03.18

Look good and drive better with the latest version of our 2010-2013 Mazdaspeed 3 Hood Scoop!

CorkSport Carbon HoodScoop Installed

Would you look at that beauty?

The CorkSport Hood Scoop has a mirror-like finish, giving your Mazdaspeed 3 a clean, styled look that’s as practical as it is fresh. With a 52% larger opening than the OEM hood scoop, you’ll increase the cold air inflow to your top mount intercooler. Boost air temperatures will drop, which means more power to the engine. You’re going to turn heads, and feel a difference in performance.

Increase Mazdaspeed 3 Cold Air Intake

We engineered this to an exact fit, meaning, if you follow the instructions, installation shouldn’t take you more than half an hour. Oh, and the fiberglass is overlaid with real carbon fiber cloth and sealed with UV-resistant, epoxy resin—so it won’t lose its shine anytime soon.

UV-resistant carbon fiber hood scoop for the Mazdaspeed 3

Convinced yet? Yeah, we thought so. Check out the 2010-2013 Mazdaspeed 3 Hood Scoop product listing page for a few more nitty-gritty details, and order yours today!

2015
03.13

Look good while you drive good (and do other stuff good too) with our new #CorkSport hashtag t-shirt.

Standing in style with the new #CorkSport t-shirt

#CorkSport says a lot in one word: That you care about quality; that you’re passionate about Mazdas; and that power and speed are some of the most important things in life—or at least driving. So why not tell the world you’re a Mazda head with this shirt?

Available in white:

White CorkSport Shirt

….and black:

Black CorkSport T-shirt

…so you can look good before or after Labor Day.

Now, onto the nitty-gritty:

  • CorkSport Service & Support: The advantage of the CorkSport hashtag shirt is that it comes in two colors and multiple sizes. Choices, guys.
  • OEM Fitment: The shirts are a 60/40 cotton/poly mix.
  • Track-Tested: We have personally worn these shirts at the track, and they hold up great to working conditions and make you look good..
  • Dusting: There is no dusting under heavy performance with these shirt.
  • All-Weather Performance: If it is raining or snowing and you are wearing just this shirt you will get wet. Sorry folks it cannot do everything. Your hair will get wet too.
  • Hashtag Obligation: Using the CorkSport hashtag will not improve the comfort level of this shirt, but you should use it anyway.

Any other questions? All right, now go get yours.

2015
03.04

Corksport Q&A

In January, we wrote a post answering questions our fans asked. It went over so well we wanted to do it again. Here are the top 7 questions we found on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter:

Question: Would you guys consider making a turbo kit for the SkyActiv engines? What challenges would you face with that engine compared to the MZR engine?Screen Shot 2015-01-21 at 12.34.32 PM

  • Questioner: Michel Balk
  • Answer: There are a few key factors that would prove difficult to overcome when turbocharging a Skyactiv-G engine. First is the extremely high compression ratio of 13-14:1. High compression ratios and boost don’t mix well, and the supporting engine design to run that high of a compression ratio is very sensitive to major engine changes. For example: The exhaust manifold is a very well-engineered 4-2-1 design that is critical to running a high compression ratio on 87 octane fuel without pre-detonation. A typical turbo kit would replace the exhaust manifold which could cause many unknown issues. Second comes down to the overall design of the engine. Mazda has made it very clear they are chasing fuel economy, not white knuckle power. So, looking at that goal from a business standpoint, why would Mazda design the engine to handle 250+hp? That would only cost them more money. The engines are lightweight in every aspect: bearing size, connecting rods, pistons, crank…the list goes on. The SkyActiv-G engines are not built for power. Lastly, what good is a turbo kit if you can’t tune it correctly? As of right now there is not an effective method to tune the SkyActiv-powered vehicle. It’s unfortunate, but a turbo SkyActiv-G is a long shot.

Question: Give us all the info about the new CS turbo in production!

  • Questioner: Jeromy Williams
  • Answer: Well I can’t go and spill the beans, but I can give you a few tidbits of information. The goal of this turbocharger is not huge power numbers. Actually I would be in shock if anyone could get this to push 400whp with meth. The goal is to provide a turbocharger that cost only slightly more than a new K04 and is 100% bolt on. When I say bolt-on, I don’t mean “bolt-on” like BNR and ATP define it. This turbocharger requires no modifications to your current intake and exhaust systems; and no modifications need to be made to the oil and coolant lines. It’s like swapping in a new K04, but with much more power potential and no blue smoke. This effectively makes the turbocharger cheaper for the customer because none of the supporting sub-systems need to be upgraded or modified. As for some specs: Power is comparable to a BNR S3, and full spool is in the 3000-3200RPM range—depending on vehicle components. The current tune on my car is reaching 21PSI at 3200RPM with the CS EBCS running in bleed setup, and that’s on the prototype turbo without the billet compressor wheel.
Source: Autoblog

Source: Autoblog

Question: Will you be doing more products for Miata?

  • Questioner: Steve Linnehan
  • Answer: We are very excited about the new MX-5 Miata hitting our shores in the near future. The CorkSport sales manager is going to buy one as soon as possible. We plan to produce a respectable lineup of performance products for the new MX-5 Miata. From suspension to power, we will help you put some more pep in the Miata’s step, so stay tuned!


Mazda 3 Exhaust SystemQuestion: What do I need to put more HP on my 2012 Mazda 3 2.0i SkyActiv?

  • Questioner: Brayam Calo
  • Answer: CorkSport has a couple options for your dilemma, Brayam. Combining our SRI, Cold Air Box, and Power Series Catback Exhaust System showed impressive gains for the little 2.0. On our dyno, the stock 2.0 made 118hp/110lbft, but when we added the components above, we saw power increase to 135hp/123lbft. This is a respectable increase in power for a naturally aspirated engine.

Question: What is an approximated max horsepower output that can be produced in an MS3 without upgrading turbo back?

  • Questioner: Christopher DeCaro
  • Answer: This is a difficult question to answer accurately as there are so many factors that play into the maximum power of an engine. The OEM downpipe is extremely restrictive on the MS3 and is commonly recommended as one of the first upgrades. Our dyno testing showed a 50hp increase over stock with only a Stage 2 intake, downpipe and racepipe installed. So as you add more components and eventually go with a larger turbocharger, the loss in power from the OEM downpipe will only increase.

Question: Is there a way to have the engine RPM drop faster while shifting or revving from an idle?

  • Questioner: Matt Zoomin Brown
  • Answer: The rate at which an engine can rev up or down comes down to simple physics: “Force = Mass x Acceleration”. You often hear of people upgrading their flywheel from the OEM steel piece to a lightweight steel or aluminum/steel two-piece flywheel. By reducing the weight of the flywheel and the rest of the rotating mass of the engine, you effectively reduce the amount of energy needed to make the engine rev up. The opposite works for revving down. The greater the mass of the rotating assembly, the more resistance need to stop the rotation—or the longer it takes to spin down. This is a result of the “Moment of Inertia” of the rotating mass.

Question: I would like to turbo my 2010 2.5 N/A Mazda 3, what do I need to know?

  • Questioner: Cynthia Senger
  • Mazdaspeed 3 is the better turbo choiceAnswer: Like everyone else I’m going to recommend you sell your car and buy a car that was turbocharged from the factory, but for the sake of argument and fueling the fire I can point you in the right direction. The 2.5 N/A engine and the 2.3 turbo engine are very similar in design. I would start with buying a blown turbo engine, removing the exterior components, and then modifying them to work on your engine. Now the easy part is done… Next, you will need some way to tune the vehicle because turbocharging an engine that was not designed to be turbocharged is not a simple bolt-on affair. If you get past these two major hurdles, then bravo! Unfortunately, unless you improved the engine internals to handle this power, the engine will probably not live long with the added stress of its newfound power. Back to the first option: Buying a Mazdaspeed 3 makes a lot more sense in many aspects. Reliability, durability, and aftermarket support make big power much easier to achieve. Granted, a Mazdaspeed 3 may be more expensive to buy upfront, but I am almost certain it will be cheaper in the long run and will come with far fewer headaches and days without a car. I wish you the best of luck!

 

Thank you for your questions and keep them coming. We’ll have a Q&A every month for your Mazda performance questions.

#ZoomZoom

Barett Strecker-01

2015
02.26

Introducing the new CorkSport Mazdaspeed 6 Rear Brake Pads!

New Mazdaspeed 6 Rear Brake Pads

 

The CorkSport brake pads for the GEN-3-429 Mazdaspeed 6 utilize a proprietary semi-metallic and ceramic formula, which offers improved braking performance while maintaining great feedback, low dust production, and less brake fade under heavy use. The CorkSport brake pads are designed to provide a good balance for daily use, spirited street driving, and autocrossing. The CorkSport brake pads are not intended for high speed track use.

Photo Credit: Joshua Klein

Photo Credit: Joshua Klein

Combine the CorkSport rear brake pads with new pads for your front wheels too for a budget-friendly and performance driven brake package today!

 

2015
02.19

Introducing the all new adjustable front camber arms for the 2006-2007 Mazdaspeed 6!

Mazdaspeed 6 Adjustable Front Camber Arms

Our new front camber arms are manufactured from A513 steel and powder-coated black for long lasting durability. The design has been FEA (Finite Element Analysis) tested and beta tested for strength and durability. Below shows the FEA with 780 lbf (0.87g lateral cornering force) applied to the ball joint (magenta arrows) with the arm pivot points fixed (green arrows). A force of 780 lbf was the result of Road & Track Magazine’s maximum corner force of 0.87g lateral in a stock Mazdaspeed 6.

Mazdaspeed Front Camber Arms Tested

The resulting FEA shows a maximum stress of 30k PSI, with the yield strength of the material being 67k PSI. Therefore, the control arm has no yielding at the stock Mazdaspeed 6’s maximum cornering force. Remember, this is a worst case scenario, because one control arm will never need to endure the entire car’s corning force. Ultimately the design has a minimum factor of safety of 2.21.


Mazdaspeed Front Camber Arm Adjustability

Probably the most exciting feature of the CorkSport Mazdaspeed 6 control arms is the camber adjustability. With an adjustment range from -0.2 degrees to -2.0 degrees, you are sure to find a setup that fits your needs. So don’t wait! Get your adjustable front camber arms here, before they’re gone!

-Barett, CS Engineering

2015
02.17

CorkSport Mazda in NASA 25 Hours of ThunderhillNot too often do you get a chance to cage up your family sedan and “run what you brung,” but that’s exactly what Mazda and Robert Davis Racing (RDR) did in the 2013 NASA 25 Hours of Thunderhill. Mazda took three brand new Mazda 6 Skyactiv diesel sedans out to the track and ran them. There were a few on-track incidents in the 2013 race but nothing too serious. Mazda was lining up to run the cars again in 2014, and several things fell into place that allowed CorkSport to provide some additional power improvements to the cars. We outfitted them with a downpipe and exhaust made from 80mm stainless steel, a high flow intake system, an upgraded intercooler and piping, and some ECU tuning. This gave the cars more power to stand a shot at the podium in E1 with better fuel economy than the other class cars and more power than the previous year.

CorkSport at NASA 25 Hours of Thunderhill

Inside the group of three Mazda Sedans was a rivalry of the Mazdaspeed Guys (comprised of Mazdaspeed Motorsports employees) and the Dealers CEB (Crayon Eating Bastards), a group of Mazda dealership owners/employees. The dealers controlled cars #55 and #56, and the Factory Guys (Mazda Employees) had #70, all fighting it out for bragging rights. Before the race got going #70 hit a snag where a coolant line came loose and overheated a motor, which prompted a Thursday motor change.

By Friday the cars were all in good shape for qualifying. This went down trouble-free despite a giant rainstorm, as if it wasn’t hard enough trying to run a fast lap with 58 other cars out on the track in six classes— all of which had different speeds.

CorkSport Mazda parts qualifying

Thankfully, by Saturday morning the weather had cleared up, and the forecast predicted dry racing for the full 25 hours. This prompted us to get the three cars ready to run on slicks which were mounted up on the wheels and installed on the cars.

CorkSport Mazda parts ready for racing

Right at 11 am the flag dropped and started the longest race in North America. This was, needless to say, an adventure for the whole team. Several hours into the race, the driver of #70 reported that the car would not shift into all of the gears. It turns out the extra power was a little harder on the drive train in the higher gears, which removed the 5th gear from being functional. The driver decided to stay out and run the race in 6th gear until the fuel stop came up. That turned out to be hours later courtesy of the excellent fuel economy of the Skyactiv engine. The pit area was prepped for a transmission swap with a spare gearbox the team had brought with them. Unfortunately, this took the car out of any chance of being on the podium, but with endurance racing you never know what will happen! So the transmission change went ahead as planned.

At the first extended yellow flag session #55 and #56 reported a power loss in the cars. This resulted in a massive jam session to diagnose and fix what was going on with the cars. Since these specific cars live their lives on the track they did not get a chance to be tested with the new modifications at low speeds (AKA street driving speeds) which brought up an exciting challenge with the fire control systems in the cars. It took ~about 2 hours to sort out the problem, and we had the #55 and #56 back at full speed heading into the night.

Mazda Sedans drive into the night

The #70 was getting its final work completed with the transmission change and ready to head out onto the track again well behind the Mazda dealers in the #55 and #56 cars. Late into the night, after a driver change, we got a call in on the radio #55 had an on-track incident with another car in the E2 class, and sadly both cars had to retire from the race. This E2 class car happened to be leading the class which RDR was also fielding “Kermit,” the green RX8, in. Though the incident was unfortunate, as a result Kermit moved to the leader position of the E2 class.

Several hours later we got a call in from #56 of an off-track situation which required the car to retire from the race too. This put the #70 Mazda 6 in position to finish ahead of the #55 and #56 for total laps if its drivers could finish the race trouble-free. As the sun came up, the #70 car was running without a hitch, as was Kermit.

Mazda RX8 racing at sunrise

From sunrise until noon, the race for the two remaining cars was uneventful. At the noon finale of the race Kermit secured the win in E2 for the first time! Like in any race, there were things you learn and adjustments for the next time on the track. I want to give a huge thanks to RDR, Mazda, Mazdaspeed, the volunteer crew peeps , and Weldon for the guidance on my first time being a crew chief for an endurance race. Lastly, a big thanks to Ruandy from Pacific Northwest Life for the great camera shots—and to my family for letting me miss an entire weekend at another race.

-Derrick

Interested in any of the diesel performance parts we developed? Shoot an email to sales@corksport.com for more information.

2015
02.06

It’s back, and it’s better than ever! Re-introducing the CorkSport weighted leather shift knob for 2004+ manual transmission Mazdas.

Side View of Mazda Shift Knob

Weighing in at a respectable 320 grams, the CorkSport leather shift knob will help smooth your gear changes and customize the interior of your Mazda while doing so. With an ergonomic design and large top surface, the CorkSport leather shift knob is comfortable to use for any grip position. Check out the difference between the OEM shift knob and the CorkSport leather shift knob.

OEM and CorkSport Shift Knob Comparison

Manufactured from Delrin plastic, then hand-wrapped and stitched with high grade black leather, the CorkSport leather shift knob will stand up to daily driving and track use day-in and day-out. The baseball style stitches are tight and clean, leaving no loose edges to fray or annoy you; and the leather has a slight texture and plushness to it, so it feels great in your hand.


View of CorkSport Mazda Shift Knob

Don’t wait! Get your leather shift knob today before they’re gone!

-Barett, CS Engineering